The Place to Book

Day Trips from Galway

Explore

Aran Islands

The rugged Aran Islands lie just outside Galway Bay and a few miles from the Clare coast and the Cliffs of Moher. Travel to us by Ferry or Air. Ferries operate to the Islands from Doolin in Co. Clare and Rossaveal in Co Galway. Flights leave from Inverin in Connemara. Loved by every visitor, the Aran Islands are 3 of the most unspoilt Islands in the Atlantic. Each of the Islands, Inis Oírr, Inis Meain and the largest Inis Mór has its own individual character. All natives speak Irish. You’ll find ancient forts, churches and monuments on all 3 Islands. 40km – 1 hour drive Ferry to Aran Islands

Rosmuc

Pádraig Pearse, who was involved in the 1916 revolution in Dublin had a cottage in Rosmuc where he wrote many of his pieces. It was in Rosmuc that he wrote his famous oration given at the grave of Ó Donnabháin Rosa in 1915, which included the immortal words " ... but, the fools, the fools, the fools! — They have left us our Fenian dead, and while Ireland holds these graves, Ireland unfree shall never be at peace." 60km - 1 hour drive

Corrib Princess Cruise on Lough Corrib

The Corrib Princess sails from Woodquay in the heart of Galway city. The journey takes passengers along the majestic River Corrib and onto Lough Corrib Irelands second largest lake providing visitors with unsurpassed views and natural amenities that make this the most spectacular waterway in Ireland. The Corrib Princess takes you past castles and various sites of both historical and cultural interest. You can enjoy this natural wonderland either as a member of a group, with your family or friends or, simply by yourself. 90 minute cruise May - September 14:30 & 16:30 Extra Sailing July & August at 12:30.

Brigit's Gardens

Brigit's Garden takes you on a magical journey into the heart of Celtic heritage and mythology, making it one of the truly outstanding places to visit in the West of Ireland. The award-winning Celtic Gardens are widely regarded as one of the most spectacular in Ireland, set within 11 acres of native woodland & wildflower meadows. In addition to the Celtic Gardens visitors can enjoy the nature trail, an ancient ring fort (fairy fort), thatched roundhouse and crannog, and the calendar sundial, the largest in Ireland. Brigit’s Garden is very family-friendly with a kids’ discovery trail, a natural playground and lots of opportunity to explore. A wonderful escape from the hustle and bustle of the city centre. It is located off the main Galway – Clifden road (N59) about 20kms from Galway City.

Kylemore Abbey

The story of Kylemore – both Castle and Abbey – is a truly remarkable one. The twists of fate which its occupants experienced, from moments of romance and happiness, to sadness and courage have all combined to create a fascinating history spanning over 150 years. Kylemore is home to a community of nuns of the Benedictine Order who came here in 1920 after their abbey in Ypres, Belgium was destroyed in World War I. Settling at Kylemore, the Benedictine Community opened a world renowned boarding school for girls and began restoring the Abbey, Gothic Church and Victorian Walled Garden to their former glory. Kylemore Abbey & Victorian Walled Garden welcomes visitors to discover the magic, beauty and peacefulness of Kylemore Abbey. Visit Kylemore Abbey and discover what makes Kylemore the no.1 must-see attraction in Connemara and the west of Ireland. Located just a few minutes from Letterfrack and 25 minutes from Clifden, Co. Galway on the N59.  OPENING HOURS: November to March 10am to 4:30pm, March to June & September to October 9:30am to 6pm, July & August 9am to 7pm. 75km  - 1 hour 30 minute drive

Aran Islands

Connemara National Park

Situated in the West of Ireland in County Galway, Connemara National Park covers some 2,957 hectares of scenic mountains, expanses of bogs, heaths, grasslands and woodlands. Some of the Park's mountains, namely Benbaun, Bencullagh, Benbrack and Muckanaght, are part of the famous Twelve Bens or Beanna Beola range. Connemara National Park was established and opened to the public in 1980. Much of the present Park lands formed part of the Kylemore Abbey Estate and the Letterfrack Industrial School, the remainder having been owned by private individuals. The southern part of the Park was at one time owned by Richard (Humanity Dick) Martin who helped to form the Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals during the early 19th century. The Park lands are now wholly owned by the State and managed solely for National Park purposes. Please note: We recommend that you cover up and wear light insect repellent. 80km - 1 hour 30 minute drive

Roundstone

Roundstone is one of the oldest villages in Connemara. The village was built in the 1820s by Scottish engineer Alexander Nimmo. In Roundstone you will find a busy little harbour, where local fishermen prepare and return with the day's catches of lobster, crayfish, crab and mackerel, plus a variety of other fish. The next village is Ballyconneely which is home to the Connemara Smokehouse. 78km - 1 hour 30 minute drive

Clifden

Clifden is a town on the coast of County Galway, Ireland and being Connemara's largest town, it is often referred to as "the Capital of Connemara". Sites enroute: Glenowla Mines, Recess Church, Quiet Man Bridge on road out to Clifden & Ballynahinch Castle. 80km - 1 hour 30 minute drive

Leenane

Leenane is on the shore of Killary Harbour, Ireland’s only fjord, on the northern edge of Connemara, and is on the route of the Western Way long-distance trail. A film adaptation of John B. Keane's famous play "The Field", directed by Jim Sherdian, was made in Leenane in 1989. Well-known stars taking part included the late Richard Harris, John Hurt and Tom Berrenger. Visitors can visit many of the locations used as sets in the film. 65.5km - 1 hour 15 minute drive

Cong

Cong is a village straddling the borders of County Galway and County Mayo, in Ireland. Cong is situated on an island formed by a number of streams that surround it on all sides. Main sites include Ashford Castle, Cong Abbey and the Quiet Man Cottage. In 1951 John Ford’s filmed “The Quiet Man” in Cong starring John Wayne and Maureen O’Hara. 45km - 45 minute drive

Cliffs of Moher

The Cliffs of Moher are Ireland’s most visited natural attraction with a magical vista that captures the hearts of up to one million visitors every year. Standing 214m (702 feet) at their highest point they stretch for 8 kilometres (5 miles) along the Atlantic coast of County Clare in the west of Ireland. OPENING HOURS: Visitors Center is open daily from 9am-5/5:30pm (June, July & August open until 9:30pm). Atlantic Edge Exhibition area in the visitor center is open daily from 9am and last entry is 30 minutes before the visitor center closes. O’Brien’s Tower is open daily from 10am with access to the viewing area on the top and the exhibition on the first floor. Admission €6 / Children under 16 Free / Seniors, Students & Disabled €4 (prices subject to change). 80km - 1 hour 30 minute drive

The Burren

The word "Burren" comes from an Irish word "Boíreann" meaning a rocky place. This is an extremely appropriate name when you consider the lack of soil cover and the extent of exposed Limestone Pavement. However it has been referred to in the past as "Fertile rock" due to the mixture of nutrient rich herb and floral species. The Burren National Park is located in the southeastern corner of the Burren and is approximately 1500 hectares in size. The Park land was bought by the Government for nature conservation and public access. It contains examples of all the major habitats within the Burren: Limestone Pavement, Calcareous grassland, Hazel scrub, Ash/hazel woodland, Turloughs, Lakes, Petrifying springs, cliffs and Fen. We recommend Lunch in Moran’s on the Weir, the Burren Perfumery or the Roadside Tavern in Lisdoonvarna beside the Burren Smokehouse. 80km - 1 hour 30 minute drive

Scroll Down